Coming to a close in Rochester

I’ve one morning of meetings left before I head back home on Friday, landing back in England on Saturday morning. It’s been a very good week. Most of it has been spent in a room with three of us, including a guy from our research lab in Haifa, Israel. We’ve been having lots of discussions about how we might want to integrate some research technology into WESB/WPS, pulling in various other people along the way to offer advice and answers to our questions, including Billy. Unfortunately, I had to be elsewhere during that meeting, so didn’t get the chance to get introduced. Things went so well that we managed to produce a pretty functional prototype.

Today I drove up Highway 52 to Minneapolis to visit a couple of customers. First up was a customer currently in the process of evaluating their needs for an ESB. I took them through a technically-biased introduction to WebSphere ESB, and some good discussion ensued. One refreshing thing about this meeting was that there was no projector, meaning I spent an hour and a half talking with them rather than presenting to them. It is surprising how much more interesting this makes the session, and certainly promotes two-way interactions. We did duck out with some of the developers in the audience at the end to another room so I could show them the WebSphere Integration Developer tooling.

The second meeting was slightly different in that the customer has another vendor incumbent, and it was more of a level-set on our SOA and ESB strategy, covering what we see as being the necessary capabilities of an ESB. For this one I did use a deck purely because there was so much more to cover in terms of introducing WebSphere ESB, Message Broker, Datapower and supporting products such as Datastage TX, WebSphere Service Registry and Repository and IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for SOA. This meeting was very, very interactive – probably a result of the audience having a greater business and architecture bias. We had some good discussions about some of their explicit requirements around issues such as how batch and file transfer fits into the bus, if at all.

On a lighter note, I spent a couple of hours after the meetings wandering around the Mall of America by Minneapolis/St. Paul airport. MOA is the largest shopping mall in the USA, and it’s certainly impressive. I was surprised to find a mini-theme park inside complete with a couple of rollercoasters. It also has an underground aquarium along with more restaurants than you could hope to eat in. The usual array of shops were present, including an Apple Store 😉 I resisted the temptation to buy anything, after all, I’ve got a wedding coming up!

The weather today has warmed up a bit from earlier in the week when it was colder than I’ve ever experienced before. Listening to one weather report on Tuesday morning it was -13C, which is probably not that cold, but it felt like it to me! Places in the far North of the state were -18F (-25C), which doesn’t even bear thinking about! I’m surprised at how quickly I got used to the cold though, and I suspect it is just one of those things you get used to out here.

One thought on “Coming to a close in Rochester

  1. Interesting what you mention about sitting down and talking with your customers. Edward Tufte (information design guy) quotes from Lou Gerstner’s autobiography in his essay ‘The Cognitive Value of Powerpoint’, where Gerstner talks about his first day at IBM and being introduced to IBM presentation culture. Paraphrasing slightly, after a few moments of dry slides, he asked his executive to ‘sit down and talk about your business’. (The closest reference I can find to this online is here: http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/business2 – for the original essay, see: http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/powerpoint). The whole concept of a ‘deck’ has often seemed strange to me as a result. Seth Godin has some interesting stuff to say about PowerPoint too: http://www.sethgodin.com/freeprize/reallybad-1.pdf

Leave a Reply